Running ZAP Attack Proxy on Jenkins

This tutorial will explain how easy you implement ZAP Attack Proxy into Jenkins. Therefor we create a Freestyle job and will use the “Official OWASP ZAP Jenkins Plugin“. That you can follow and reproduce the tutorial, you need a running Jenkins instance with SSH access to it and proper system rights (OS, Jenkins).

Install ZAP Attack Proxy

Following steps needs to be done when SSH connection, to Jenkins, is established.

Note: If you don’t restart Jenkins after creating “ZAPROXY_HOME”, you will run into trouble like “java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: ZAP INSTALLATION DIRECTORY IS MISSING, PROVIDED [ null ]”

Install needed Jenkins PlugIn’s

Search for “OWAS ZAP” and for “HTML Publisher” plugins.

Jenkins Plugin OWASP ZAP
Official OWASP ZAP
Jenkins Plugin HTML Publisher
HTML Publisher

Configure Jenkins Freestyle job

All what we need is there, we can start to setup a Jenkins “Freestyle project” with the name “ZAPAttackProxy”.

Create new Jenkins Freestyle Project
Jenkins Freestyle Project

The next setting is optional… I recommend to find your own value (I go with 5 for that example).

Discard old builds
Max # of builds to keep

On every build (Jenkins job run) the workspace should be clean. Please enable the checkbox.

Delete workspace before build starts
Delete workspace before build starts

We add now the build step. This build step is available because of the PlugIn “Official OWASP ZAP“.

Add build step Execute ZAP
Build step: Execute ZAP

Now we have many fields to configure. We start to set the values for section “Admin Configurations”.

ZAP Admin Configuration
Admin Configuration

As we already installed ZAP and created the entry into /etc/environment, we can now use that variable.

ZAP Installation Method
Installation Method

For ZAP Home Directory we add the path to the workspace and let the build create the directory “.ZAP”. For Session Management we choose “Persist Session” and give filename “my_session”.

ZAP Home Directory and Session Management
Home Directory & Session Management

Under section “Session Properties” you add the Context Name “default” and for “Include in Context” you can add IP’s and/or Domains. For that example I choose “http://scanme.nmap.org/*”.

ZAP Session Properties
Session Properties

In section “Attack Method” you can choose different attack methods like Spider Scan and so on. Please set always a “Starting Point”. The settings here are self explainable.

ZAP Attack Method
Attack Method

Enable checkbox “Generate Reports” in section “Finalize Run”. Now enter a filename and select “XML” and “HTML” format.

ZAP Finalize Run
Finalize Run

Note: You can ignore the HTTP 404 error.

We are done! To provide on our job dashboard a link for HTML report, you can use now the HTML Publisher.

ZAP Publish HTML reports
Publish HTML reports

Execute the job and play with “Attack Methods”…

Nessus on AWS

Nessus is a vulnerability scanner from Tenable. In this tutorial I will show how you can install Nessus on AWS (Debian), how you connect your local browser and perform a simple network scan. You need only a AWS account (eq Free Tier), SSH and a web browser.

Note: Please have a look on that page about pentesting on AWS first.

Create new EC2 instance

Login into your AWS console (or use AWSCLI), create a new SecurityGroup with SSH port 22 only (inbound) and launch a new instance. Search for “Debian”…

AWS EC2 Debian 9
Debian 9 on AWS Maretplace

Press button “Select” and finish all needed following steps (save your keys). After your EC2 instance is ready check for IP or DNS and connect.

Install Nessus

Open download page and select latest version for Debian (as I wrote this tutorial it was Nessus-8.5.1-debian6_amd64.deb). Confirm and download. Via SCP, in new terminal, you can upload the file to your EC2 instance.

Back to instance terminal … Now install and start Nessus.

Use Nessus

To make our life easier, we will create a simple SSH port-forward.

Now you can open your favourite browser with URL: https://localhost:8834.

Nessus Initialization
Initialisation of Nessus

When the initialization has been completed successfully, login and create a new scan. Select “Basic Network Scan” and add URL: http://scanme.nmap.org. Select “Basic Network Scan” and “Port scan (common ports)” for scan settings. Save and start your created scan. Please be patient, the scan will take a while.

Nessus scan
Running Nessus scan

Create a scan report

After a while, the scan is complete. Now you can create a “Custom” report. BTW … feature is only available for completed scans. So select “Export” – “Custom” and generate the report.

Nessus Report
Create custom HTML report

Apache Guacamole

Apache Guacamole … What is it about? It’s a client-less remote gateway for Telnet, SSH, RDP and VNC. Client-less, because there is no need to install any plugin or additional software for users (clients). The client will use just the browser (also without any plugin). In this tutorial we will create a very simple environment via Vagrant and use Guacamole. Why the tutorial? Because I know a lot of testers for example – who work with Windows, who are not allowed to install any software (eq Putty) but still need access to environments. … Next point are for example public security groups on cloud providers. Here only one port would be needed to support different protocols on different hosts (incl. file transfer).

What we need?

Project preparation

Okay, via your favorite editor you now add the content of all files. All files inside directory “src” are configuration files (installed on Guacamole host).

This file (user-mapping.xml) is the configuration for all your connections.

The ShellProvisioner.sh includes all installation and configuration for Guacamole All examples are provided but for Debian RDP is currently not working and I commented out.

Usage

First start-up the environment (via simple Vagrant command) and next start the VNC inside the box. You can do via vagrant ssh or you start the VNC via Browser (SSH).

Now login with “USERNAME/PASSWORD” (see src/user-mapping.xml) on http://localhost:55555/guacamole. If everything works it should look like this:

Guacamole on browser

Please have a look here https://guacamole.apache.org/doc/gug/index.html to learn more about configuration and authentication. All files which we used in this tutorial are available via https://github.com/Lupin3000/GuacamoleExample.

Simple VPN via WireGuard

This tutorial will show how to setup a simple test environment via Vagrant and to install, configure and use WireGuard VPN software. In this tutorial Debian 10 is used, you can find the documentation about other OS on WireGuard website.

Preparation

First make sure VirtualBox and Vagrant are installed in latest versions. Now create needed project and files.

Usage

All files are created and we can start to start the environment.

For box 1 (host-a)

For box 2 (host-b)

Important is that your ports and keys will be different and be patient before start ping each other – have fun…