Apache Guacamole

Apache Guacamole … What is it about? It’s a client-less remote gateway for Telnet, SSH, RDP and VNC. Client-less, because there is no need to install any plugin or additional software for users (clients). The client will use just the browser (also without any plugin). In this tutorial we will create a very simple environment via Vagrant and use Guacamole. Why the tutorial? Because I know a lot of testers for example – who work with Windows, who are not allowed to install any software (eq Putty) but still need access to environments. … Next point are for example public security groups on cloud providers. Here only one port would be needed to support different protocols on different hosts (incl. file transfer).

What we need?

Project preparation

Okay, via your favorite editor you now add the content of all files. All files inside directory “src” are configuration files (installed on Guacamole host).

This file (user-mapping.xml) is the configuration for all your connections.

The ShellProvisioner.sh includes all installation and configuration for Guacamole All examples are provided but for Debian RDP is currently not working and I commented out.

Usage

First start-up the environment (via simple Vagrant command) and next start the VNC inside the box. You can do via vagrant ssh or you start the VNC via Browser (SSH).

Now login with “USERNAME/PASSWORD” (see src/user-mapping.xml) on http://localhost:55555/guacamole. If everything works it should look like this:

Guacamole on browser

Please have a look here https://guacamole.apache.org/doc/gug/index.html to learn more about configuration and authentication. All files which we used in this tutorial are available via https://github.com/Lupin3000/GuacamoleExample.

Curl via Socks5 proxy on macOS

SSH tunnel in Browsers are easy! What about curl? Yeah – it`s easy, too!

Preparation

Check minimal firewall rules and SSH configuration on target host.

Create SSH tunnel

  • C: use compression (level can be set in configuration file)
  • 4: forces ssh to use IPv4 only
  • N: do not execute a remote command
  • D: specifies dynamic application-level port forwarding
  • v: verbose mode
  • f: go to background before command execution
  • p: port to connect to on the remote host

Check SSH tunnel

The following examples will help you to monitor the connection to the target server.

Use SSH tunnel

Now we use the tunnel via curl.

Note: There are two protocol prefixes socks5:// and socks5h://. The 2nd will let the SOCKS server handle DNS-queries.

Kill SSH tunnel

The simplest and hardest way to kill SSH tunnels (on background) is following example. But be careful it kills all ssh connections!