Jenkins and Sitespeed.io

While surfing the internet I stumbled across Sitespeed.io. It’s a amazing collection of Open Source Tools, which make performance measuring for developers and testers super easy. I tried it out and was immediately impressed. Here’s a little tutorial on how to use Jenkins and Sitespeed.

Requirements

  • Docker (latest)

Environment setup

With minimal 2 commands the environment (via Docker) is already created. Most of the time will be needed for the plugins installation.

On setup wizard finish: unlock Jenkins, install the suggested plugins, create an account and finish the instance configuration.

Jenkins permissions to /var/run/docker.sock

Before you start with Jenkins job configuration, ensure that user jenkins has permissions to /var/run/docker.sock.

Jenkins job configuration

When Jenkins is ready (restarted), install the HTML Publisher PlugIn (no restart after installation of plugin required).

Jenkins HTML Publisher Plugin

Create a new free-style project named SiteSpeed.

Jenkins SiteSpeed Project

Attention: You need to specify later the absolute path to the local directory /target/workspace/SiteSpeed. If you do not know how, press save and start the build without any job information (empty job configuration) and follow the optional instructions.

In my case the path is: “/Users/steffen/Projects/Sitespeed/target/workspace/SiteSpeed”. Under job configuration section “Build” enable “Execute shell” and paste following command.

Via Post-Build-Action: Publish HTML reports you can enter the report very simple from the job project page.

Jenkins SiteSpeed Job Configuration

Save everything and run the job. After a short time you can look at the HTML report. See “Pages” > “https://www.sitespeed.io/” for screenshots, HAR and video files. On the website of sitespeed.io is a very detailed documentation and many more examples. Have fun!

Create QA dashboards with Grafana (Part 1)

Since I have my new role (Head of QA), many employees constantly want metrics from me. That means a lot of work for me. But since I do not always want to deal with such things, I have searched for a simpler way. So the question was – how can I deliver this data at any time and possibly from different sources (eq. JIRA, pipelines, test results, Salesforce, etc.)? Hmmm … Grafana is awesome – not only for DevOps! So in this tutorial series, I’d like to show you how to create nice and meaningful dashboards for your QA metrics in Grafana.

What you need?

  • Docker installed (latest version)
  • Bash (min. 3.2.x)

Prepare the project

In order to create dashboards in Grafana, you need a small environment (Grafana/InfluxDB) as well as some data. The next steps will help you to create them. The environment/services are simulated by docker containers. For the fictitious data, just use the bash script which I created for this tutorial.

Now copy/paste the content of the two files with your favorite editor. The content of docker-compose.yml.

And here the content of CreateData.sh.

Start environment and create data

Once the project and the files have been created, you can build and start the environment. For this you use Docker Compose.

In next step you create the InfluxDB databases (incl. fictitious measurements, series and data) via Bash script.

Note: You could use influx command to administrate InfluxDB directly.

Okay the environment preparation is done. Now start Grafana in browser.

New Grafana Login

The default username and password is “admin:admin“. Note, if you use docker-compose down you have to repeat most of steps like data creation. Better use docker-compose stop! … See you in 2nd part – where we add data sources and create dashboards.

Vagrant and Vault

I was a little surprised why there is no Vagrant plug-in for Vault. Then I thought no matter, because the Vagrantfile is actually a Ruby script. Let me try it. I have to say right away that I’m not a Ruby developer! But here is my solution which has brought me to the goal.

Prerequisite

  • latest Vault installed (0.11.0)
  • latest Vagrant installed (2.1.3)

Prepare project and start Vault

Here my simple vagrant policy (don’t do that in production).

And here is my crazy and fancy Vagrantfile

Configure Vault

Run it

😉 … it just works

Start with Vault 0.10.x

HashiCorp released Vault version 0.10.x on April 2018. The 0.10.x release delivers many new features and changes (eq. K/V Secrets Engine v2, Vault Web UI, etc.). Please have a look on vault/CHANGELOG for more informations. This tiny tutorial will concentrate now on usage of Vault’s Key-Value Secrets Engine via CLI.

Preparation

Start Vault server in development mode

Do not stop the process and open new tab on terminal [COMMAND] + [t].

Create, Read, Update and Delete secrets

As you can see, there are minor changes to previous versions of Vault.

Note: The API for the Vault KV secrets engine even changed.

Okay, back to CLI and some examples which are better for automation. We will use the STDIN and a simple JSON file.

Web UI

Previously the Web UI was for Enterprise only, now it has been made open source.

Now you can use the root token to sign in.

Create a simple video test environment (Part 3)

Okay, now is time to see some command line tools to analysis videos. I selected 4 Open-Source applications (avprobe, mediainfo, mplayer, exiftool).

Specification

  • docker
  • git

Get ready for docker images

On Bitbucket I created a repository with needed Dockerfiles for fast usage. You can also choose the installation method.

mediainfo

Lets start with mediainfo. Here some information about on wikipedia.

mplayer

Second application is mplayer. Here the wikipedia link.

exiftool

Now we take a look on exiftool. Here the wikipedia article and the official documentation.

avprobe

Last but not least avprobe. Here the wikipedia article and detailed official documentation.

Compare tools by expecting specific result

I will not judge the applications against each other! But here a compare of complexity of commands and output for video duration.

Jenkins, InfluxDB and Grafana

Today an basic introduction to Jenkins, InfluxDB and Grafana. Docker is used to save some time. Okay,… let’s start.

Preparation

Jenkins preparation

Now open your favorite browser with URL http://localhost:8080 and unlook Jenkins with following steps.

unlook jenkins

  1. unlook with password from cli
  2. install suggested plugins
  3. create your admin user
  4. start using jenkins

Next, the InfluxDB plug-in must be installed.

influxdb plugin jenkins

InfluxDB preparation

Connect Jenkins with InfluxDB

Add new InfluxDB target on Jenkins

jenkins influxdb settings

Save and create a new freestyle job. For example with following configuration.

jenkins job influxdb

When you are done, run the job.

Add Grafana

Open you browser with URL http://localhost:3000, login with credentials (admin/admin) and add a new InfluxDB data source.

grafana data source

From now on, you can create and share dashboards in Grafana, which shows all Jenkins metrics.

Build notifications with CatLight

CatLight is the the perfect app if you would like to know the current status of your continuous delivery pipelines, tasks and bugs. Without looking on E-Mails or visit build servers you know when attention is needed. It’s available for Debian, Ubuntu, Windows and MacOS.

CatLight works with Jenkins, TFS, Travis CI and many more.

catlight setup

After successful installation and configuration, CatLight offers a lot of cool features.

catlight jobs

For personal usage it’s free, you only have to register.

Quick and dirty sync folders for Vagrant

Background

In our company we have different development teams working with same Vagrant boxes. As a challenge they need different sync folder locations – even inside teams. I’m just too lazy to provide and maintain all Vagrantfile templates for their needs. So i provide a quick and dirty solution for them.

Example

Usage

😉