Nessus on AWS

Nessus is a vulnerability scanner from Tenable. In this tutorial I will show how you can install Nessus on AWS (Debian), how you connect your local browser and perform a simple network scan. You need only a AWS account (eq Free Tier), SSH and a web browser.

Note: Please have a look on that page about pentesting on AWS first.

Create new EC2 instance

Login into your AWS console (or use AWSCLI), create a new SecurityGroup with SSH port 22 only (inbound) and launch a new instance. Search for “Debian”…

AWS EC2 Debian 9
Debian 9 on AWS Maretplace

Press button “Select” and finish all needed following steps (save your keys). After your EC2 instance is ready check for IP or DNS and connect.

Install Nessus

Open download page and select latest version for Debian (as I wrote this tutorial it was Nessus-8.5.1-debian6_amd64.deb). Confirm and download. Via SCP, in new terminal, you can upload the file to your EC2 instance.

Back to instance terminal … Now install and start Nessus.

Use Nessus

To make our life easier, we will create a simple SSH port-forward.

Now you can open your favourite browser with URL: https://localhost:8834.

Nessus Initialization
Initialisation of Nessus

When the initialization has been completed successfully, login and create a new scan. Select “Basic Network Scan” and add URL: http://scanme.nmap.org. Select “Basic Network Scan” and “Port scan (common ports)” for scan settings. Save and start your created scan. Please be patient, the scan will take a while.

Nessus scan
Running Nessus scan

Create a scan report

After a while, the scan is complete. Now you can create a “Custom” report. BTW … feature is only available for completed scans. So select “Export” – “Custom” and generate the report.

Nessus Report
Create custom HTML report

Apache Guacamole

Apache Guacamole … What is it about? It’s a client-less remote gateway for Telnet, SSH, RDP and VNC. Client-less, because there is no need to install any plugin or additional software for users (clients). The client will use just the browser (also without any plugin). In this tutorial we will create a very simple environment via Vagrant and use Guacamole. Why the tutorial? Because I know a lot of testers for example – who work with Windows, who are not allowed to install any software (eq Putty) but still need access to environments. … Next point are for example public security groups on cloud providers. Here only one port would be needed to support different protocols on different hosts (incl. file transfer).

What we need?

Project preparation

Okay, via your favorite editor you now add the content of all files. All files inside directory “src” are configuration files (installed on Guacamole host).

This file (user-mapping.xml) is the configuration for all your connections.

The ShellProvisioner.sh includes all installation and configuration for Guacamole All examples are provided but for Debian RDP is currently not working and I commented out.

Usage

First start-up the environment (via simple Vagrant command) and next start the VNC inside the box. You can do via vagrant ssh or you start the VNC via Browser (SSH).

Now login with “USERNAME/PASSWORD” (see src/user-mapping.xml) on http://localhost:55555/guacamole. If everything works it should look like this:

Guacamole on browser

Please have a look here https://guacamole.apache.org/doc/gug/index.html to learn more about configuration and authentication. All files which we used in this tutorial are available via https://github.com/Lupin3000/GuacamoleExample.

Simple VPN via WireGuard

This tutorial will show how to setup a simple test environment via Vagrant and to install, configure and use WireGuard VPN software. In this tutorial Debian 10 is used, you can find the documentation about other OS on WireGuard website.

Preparation

First make sure VirtualBox and Vagrant are installed in latest versions. Now create needed project and files.

Usage

All files are created and we can start to start the environment.

For box 1 (host-a)

For box 2 (host-b)

Important is that your ports and keys will be different and be patient before start ping each other – have fun…

Man in the Middle Attack (MITM)

In this tutorial you will learn how to work a man in the middle attack. For this you will create and configure a simple test environment. The test environment simulates a small home network with a NAT router, a client (victim) and another client (evil) that has already penetrated the network. For the attack itself, you will get in touch with popular mitmf framework.

Attention: The tutorial is presented just for educational purposes. If you do what you have learned outside the test environment, you may be liable to prosecution.

Requirements

  • VirtualBox (5.2.18)
  • Vagrant (2.1.5)

Prepare environment

In the first step, you need to configure, setup and provision the environment. Vagrant will help you here. Via Vagrant you will create all needed virtual machines (incl. SSH keys) and install the needed packages on the evil engine. Via file machines.yml you could add Vagrant boxes for Windows, macOS as well.

Note: Please remove the spaces behind etc (in the Vagrantfile)! These are only because of the security settings of my provider.

Small network changes

You must now switch from typical NAT to NAT network. For that you stop (halt) all VM’s. In the next steps you will create a new NAT network and configure the VM network adapters for this network. In the end, you simulated a simple home network.

Start all VM’s again

In this step we start all VM’s but without Vagrant.

Now check the network interfaces for both VM’s. Please note down the IP’s, you will need them in next steps. You can login in both with credentials vagrant:vagrant.

Note: In the example the evil VM has the IP: 192.168.15.5 and the victim the IP: 192.168.15.6 – this could be different for you.

In order not to use the VirtualBox Terminal, create a port forward from the localhost to the evil VM.

Man-in-the-middle attack

You made it, the test environment is finally ready. If you have been able to learn something new up to this point, I am glad. Now imagine the following situation. You are the victim and you surf the Internet, logging in on your popular websites. Can you imagine what can happen? In a few minutes you will see it.

Once the Ubuntu has booted, run the following command (as evil) and surf the web using the Firefox browser (as victim). If the mitmf returns an error message, repeat the command in the terminal. Be a bit patient on successful call.

Mitmf still offers a lot of plug-ins, just give it a try.

Unseal Vault with PGP

In this tutorial I will show an example for unsealing Vault using GPG. We generate for two users the keys and each user will use them to unseal. For the storage we use Consul.

Conditions

Host Preparation

First we need to setup, configure and start Consul and Vault.

Note: Because of the security settings of my provider, spaces are after “etc”. Please delete it after copy/paste.

Do not stop and/or close any terminal sessions!

Your project folder now should look like this:

Client Preparation

As I wrote – we need to simulate two users. Now to the Docker client’s…

Both client’s need similar configuration, so please execute the following steps on both containers.

Your project folder now should look like this:

Initialize and Unseal Vault

On the host we initialize the Vault and share unseal key’s back to the client’s.

Note: Save now all keys and share the correspondending <unseal keys> to the client’s!

Now our client’s can start the unseal of Vault. Even here, please execute the following steps on both containers.

Just for information

We configured both services (Consul and Vault) with WebUI.

Use the “Initial Root Token” to login into Vault’s WebUI.

Create a simple video test environment (Part 3)

Okay, now is time to see some command line tools to analysis videos. I selected 4 Open-Source applications (avprobe, mediainfo, mplayer, exiftool).

Specification

  • docker
  • git

Get ready for docker images

On Bitbucket I created a repository with needed Dockerfiles for fast usage. You can also choose the installation method.

mediainfo

Lets start with mediainfo. Here some information about on wikipedia.

mplayer

Second application is mplayer. Here the wikipedia link.

exiftool

Now we take a look on exiftool. Here the wikipedia article and the official documentation.

avprobe

Last but not least avprobe. Here the wikipedia article and detailed official documentation.

Compare tools by expecting specific result

I will not judge the applications against each other! But here a compare of complexity of commands and output for video duration.

Build notifications with CatLight

CatLight is the the perfect app if you would like to know the current status of your continuous delivery pipelines, tasks and bugs. Without looking on E-Mails or visit build servers you know when attention is needed. It’s available for Debian, Ubuntu, Windows and MacOS.

CatLight works with Jenkins, TFS, Travis CI and many more.

catlight setup

After successful installation and configuration, CatLight offers a lot of cool features.

catlight jobs

For personal usage it’s free, you only have to register.

Lunar – a UNIX security auditing tool

LUNAR is a open source UNIX security auditing tool written in Shell script. It offers the audit for various operating systems like Linux (RHEL, CentOS, Debian, Ubuntu), Solaris and Mac OS with less requirements. Services like Docker and AWS are also supported.

Download

Clone repository

Download via curl

Usage

The use is very easy…