Man in the Middle Attack (MITM)

In this tutorial you will learn how to work a man in the middle attack. For this you will create and configure a simple test environment. The test environment simulates a small home network with a NAT router, a client (victim) and another client (evil) that has already penetrated the network. For the attack itself, you will get in touch with popular mitmf framework.

Attention: The tutorial is presented just for educational purposes. If you do what you have learned outside the test environment, you may be liable to prosecution.

Requirements

  • VirtualBox (5.2.18)
  • Vagrant (2.1.5)

Prepare environment

In the first step, you need to configure, setup and provision the environment. Vagrant will help you here. Via Vagrant you will create all needed virtual machines (incl. SSH keys) and install the needed packages on the evil engine. Via file machines.yml you could add Vagrant boxes for Windows, macOS as well.

Note:Β Please remove the spaces behind etc (in the Vagrantfile)! These are only because of the security settings of my provider.

Small network changes

You must now switch from typical NAT to NAT network. For that you stop (halt) all VM’s. In the next steps you will create a new NAT network and configure the VM network adapters for this network. In the end, you simulated a simple home network.

Start all VM’s again

In this step we start all VM’s but without Vagrant.

Now check the network interfaces for both VM’s. Please note down the IP’s, you will need them in next steps. You can login in both with credentials vagrant:vagrant.

Note: In the example the evil VM has the IP: 192.168.15.5 and the victim the IP: 192.168.15.6 – this could be different for you.

In order not to use the VirtualBox Terminal, create a port forward from the localhost to the evil VM.

Man-in-the-middle attack

You made it, the test environment is finally ready. If you have been able to learn something new up to this point, I am glad. Now imagine the following situation. You are the victim and you surf the Internet, logging in on your popular websites. Can you imagine what can happen? In a few minutes you will see it.

Once the Ubuntu has booted, run the following command (as evil) and surf the web using the Firefox browser (as victim). If the mitmf returns an error message, repeat the command in the terminal. Be a bit patient on successful call.

Mitmf still offers a lot of plug-ins, just give it a try.

Vagrant and Vault

I was a little surprised why there is no Vagrant plug-in for Vault. Then I thought no matter, because the Vagrantfile is actually a Ruby script. Let me try it. I have to say right away that I’m not a Ruby developer! But here is my solution which has brought me to the goal.

Prerequisite

  • latest Vault installed (0.11.0)
  • latest Vagrant installed (2.1.3)

Prepare project and start Vault

Here my simple vagrant policy (don’t do that in production).

And here is my crazy and fancy Vagrantfile

Configure Vault

Run it

πŸ˜‰ … it just works

Create a simple video test environment (Part 2)

In the first part we created the video test environment and you learned how to extend it. At the end of this tutorial you will know how to embed video content in the video test environment. Therefore, a few basics are shown around ffmpeg (how to create, edit and use videos).

Record and prepare some videos

The recording should contain video and sound and should be 5 minutes long. The content of the video does not matter!

As soon as a video is ready we have to create more.

Note: After this step you will have many video files which you willΒ use

  • ./movie.mov (original)
  • ./demo.mp4 (converted)
  • ./src/demo_scaled.mp4 (converted and resized)
  • ./src/output.m3u8
  • ./src/\*.ts

Get in contact with ffmpeg

I assume that ffmpeg is properly installed and the test environment is running.

Stream videos

Stream from FaceTime HD Camera (macOS)

Create a simple video test environment

In this series I would like to clarify the following questions. How can you test local videos and videos provided by a server? What tools are there? How could the test environment look like? … So these tutorials should provide an entry into the subject of video testing. In this part, we will provide the test environment.

Specification

additional Software

Files

Project Structure

Prepare and run your test environment

The test environment will created by Vagrant. The Vagrant Base box needs to be provided with Debian 9. Therefore you have now 2 options. You can use a Debian 9 Base box from Vagrant cloud or you create your own. To create your own Debian 9 Base box you can use my Packer Git repository.

Please ensure, that the Β Vagrantfile is properly configured (config.vm.box_url, config.vm.box) before start-up environment.

After successful start you will find some informations on start pageΒ about How-to create, modify, upload and stream videos. In second tutorial we will have a detailed look on it.

StartPage Video Test Environment

To understand the background somewhat better, take a look!

Develop some more

There are even more ways to publish video files (Media Streaming Server). You can easily expand the environment. Just customize/create the configurations and files in the “src” folder as well as the Vagrantfile. For Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) support take a look here. This link opens the commercial software solution.

Note: You simply link the IDE with the “src” folder. To change the images and videos, just run vagant provisioner.

Download and install ffmpeg binaries on macOS

Currently official ffmpeg packages are available for Windows, Linux (Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, RedHat) and macOS. You can download latest versions here.

Here now a solution for macOS users, if you don’t like to install many additional software on your system (static FFmpeg binaries).

Now some basic ffmpeg commands, which should work now. If you like,you can move the binary into directory “/usr/local/”.

Okay, that’s it for first tutorial.

Quick and dirty sync folders for Vagrant

Background

In our company we have different development teams working with same Vagrant boxes. As a challenge they need different sync folder locations – even inside teams. I’m just too lazy to provide and maintain all Vagrantfile templates for their needs. So i provide a quick and dirty solution for them.

Example

Usage

πŸ˜‰

Test your infrastructure

Infrastructures can be very big. Luckily, there are provisioner like Chef, Salt, Ansible and etc. These provisioners can be very complex and possibly the developer has done something wrong. Therefore the infrastructure has to be tested! Tools like goss, Serverspec and Testinfra helps testers to validate. This tutorial show the first steps with Testinfra.

Testinfra is written in Python very small and easy to understand. Here is the GitHub repository.

Precondition

  • Vagrant (min. 1.9.3) installed
  • Python (min. 2.7) installed
  • pip (min. 9.0.1) and virtualenv (min. 15.1.0) installed
  • make (min. 3.81) installed

Project structure

To get used to it – i prepared some files for you. You only need to change the box name/url in Vagrantfile.

Usage

Testinfra offers several connections backends for remote command execution and can be used with python standard unit test framework: unittest. So the integration with build servers is easily possible.

Vagrant tipps and tricks

This time a few things which make life easier.

Check for Windows

There a quit some situations for Vagrant where you have platform specific steps to do. Here an example for Windows.

Set a default provider

By default, VirtualBox is the default provider for Vagrant but sometimes it is needed to change.

It is possible to use environment variables in Vagrantfile. So the 2nd option is to set provider inside Vagrantfile!

Multiple Vagrantfiles in one directory

Sometimes it could happen that you have multiple Vagrantfiles in one directory. In such case environment variables helps.

Create log files

To enable detailed logging use the VAGRANT_LOG environmental variable.

Level names can be “debug”, “info”, “warn” and “error”.

Jenkins log without colored output

For Jenkins log, the color output is superfluous! Here an simple example:

Vagrant Manager

Do you like Vagrant? … Yes? … Then you will love Vagrant Manger! Vagrant Manager is free and available for Mac OS and Windows. But pictures say more than 1000 words…

Windows
windows demo

Copyright Β© byΒ Lanayo Technologies

Mac OS
mac os demo

Copyright Β© byΒ Lanayo Technologies

Downloads are available via GitHub (WindowsMac OS).The developers have done a very good job here!